Water

Project 365 | 130226 | Water Drip

A heavy rain kept the area soaking wet most of the day, but being from the Northwest rain never gets me blue, as it reminds me of my childhood. So, I adventured outside and found a puddle that had a couple of big drips feeding it, so I put my 2x extender on my 70-200mm and zoomed in on the action at 400mm.

I cranked my ISO way up, so I could have both a fast shutter speed and a some what normal f/stop (image below is 12800 ISO, 1/1600 sec, f/5.6). I then switched to continuous shutter, so I could capture about six frames a second. After a few misses, I got the groove of the drips pattern and was able to freeze action on a few fun drips, including the one below.


Project 365 | 130226 | Water Drip | © Jay Moore Photography


Project 365 | 130115 | Raindrops

A cold, wet day in the mid-Atlantic states called for an image of some raindrops.


Project 365 | 130115 | Raindrops | © Jay Moore Photography

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Project 365 | 130102 | Water

Swallow Falls State Park is a beautiful location in Western Maryland that provides several great waterfalls to photograph. My shutter was at 1/3 sec to help blur Muddy Creek Falls and the water flowing out of the scene.


Project 365 | 130102 | © Jay Moore Photography

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Lake Louise Morning Light

Lake Louise is a wonderful place to visit most anytime of the day, but is especially beautiful during the sunrise. It’s the best time to soak up the lake and surrounding Canadian Rockies because during the morning hours it showcases some amazing light while you’re only sharing the scene with a handful of other folks, versus hundreds of people later in the morning. That is why I highly recommend setting you alarm clock early, grab a cup of coffee and get to this location a few minutes prior to sunrise … You’ll not be disappointed.

When I arrived on this particular morning, there was a red canoe in the lake paddling around. It was the only one on the lake and I thought it would work perfectly for some interest in the foreground. So, I found a spot along the edge of the lake quickly composed the scene to showcase the glacier and its reflection in the lake, made sure to include the rising moon and then waited for the canoe to move into the position I wanted, then I snapped off a few frames.


Lake Louise Morning Light | © Jay Moore Photography

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Wave 4805

I always enjoy photographing moving water and in this case it’s the ocean and it’s from my wave series. It’s captured from a somewhat unusual position, almost straight above the wave, as I was on a cliff and the tide was almost all the way in (just out of the frame towards the bottom of the image is the rock cliff). I positioned myself so a rock within the sand was within the scene and waited for the waves to come ashore. It was one of those times that I could have stayed there for hours and never captured the same image twice. The black and white conversion helps create and abstract look to the scene.


Wave 4805 | © Jay Moore Photography

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Lake Louise | Sunrise

Lake Louise is a beautiful place to visit within Banff National Park. It’s a popular destination for tourists around the world and after you get a chance to see the area with your own eyes, you quickly understand why it’s become so crowded with summer vacationers.

One great way to see the lake is during the morning sunrise, as the crowds of tourists are diminished dramatically, but more importantly the mountains and glaciers face east, which puts a soft, warm light upon the scene. And on certain mornings, such as in the image below, the alpine wind hasn’t begun to blow, leaving the lake crystal clear for an amazing reflection of the surrounding mountains and glaciers.


Lake Louise | Sunrise | Banff National Park | © Jay Moore Photography

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Avalanche Gorge | Glacier National Park

The Avalanche Lake Trail is a beautiful hike that includes an amazing view of the lake at the half-way point of your trip. However, the beginning and end of the trail (since it’s an out and back trail) takes you along Avalanche Gorge, where Avalanche Creek rushes through a narrow slit of hard rock, creating interesting shapes and forms.

My sturdy tripod was a fixture on all of our hikes during our visit to Glacier National Park and was a vital piece of equipment in capturing the fast moving water of Avalanche Gorge, since I wanted to blur the water with longer exposures. The image below was captured with a 2.5 second exposure at ISO 100 and f22, creating great depth of field while giving the water a flowing sensation throughout the scene.


Avalanche Gorge | Glacier National Park | © Jay Moore Photography

Hiking Insight: This is a very popular trail and is considered a somewhat easier hike within GNP, as it’s roughly 4 miles round trip with an elevation gain of about 600 feet. This is a great afternoon hike, as the main cliffs that surround the lake faces west, so starting the hike at or after lunch time is recommended. This is also a great hike to combine with another smaller hike that can be taken in the morning, such as Hidden Lake near Logan Pass.

Research Insight: We used both the Vicky Spring’s book (Glacier National Park and Waterton Lakes National Park: A Complete Recreation Guide) and our iphone App (HIKE – Glacier National Park) throughout our time in Glacier National Park and I highly suggest purchasing them both before your visit.

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Reflections

There’s something about seeing the world through a waters reflection that always gets me excited. I love photographing still water masses, as it gives me an opportunity to explore the abstract of reflections.

In the image below, the sky was beginning to open up and the clouds were reflecting beautifully within the calm water. I found a branch that was hanging out over the bank and composed my image. I snapped a few frames, but when a few droplets fell into the water creating a couple of rings, I fired away as I knew it would help create more depth and interest within the lower part of the image.


Reflections | © Jay Moore Photography

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Capturing Light

Light is king in photography. It creates shadows and highlights, thus creating depth, shape, texture and drama within a scene. And capturing that light is how you can translate a scene that you see into a photograph that’s worth viewing.

There are many ways to capture light and I don’t advise photographing into the sun very often, as it tends to give mediocre results. Plus, the light that the sun produces is much better photographed at angles. But, every now and again when the elements come together you can capture some dramatic images, such as the image below.

The suns light shinning brightly off the calm ocean water in combination with dotted backlit islands throughout gives the image some movement. Since it was pretty much already a monochromatic scene, I converted the image to black and white in post. Add in the lone boat in the sunlight positioned at a key 1/3 intersection and the scene becomes a photograph.


Capturing Light | © Jay Moore Photography

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Morning Light

The golden hour around sunrise has a unique quality of light that is completely different than its evening counterpart. In the process overcoming night and beginning to warm the earth, there are many beautiful elements that can arise because of the change in temperature.

While out photographing on a morning walk, the first rays of sun that hit the water created an interesting scene, as the lakes water began evaporating. And sometimes you get lucky when you’re ready to take a photograph, as in this situation, when a canoe floated slowly by just as the steam began moving upward toward the sky. After repositioning slightly, I was able to snap off a few frames before the steam had disappeared.


Morning Light | © Jay Moore Photography

To see additional images within my landscape portfolio, click on this link


Water #1711 | Raging River

I love photographing the many forms that water takes, whether it being a slow meandering creek or, in the case of the image below, a raging river just after a heavy rain fall. The sights and sounds of such an area is always a good thing to experience every now and again because it reminds you of the true power that mother nature can hold.

Safely perched up on a bridge that crossed the river (which has been washed out many times), I was able to get a great vantage point to showcase the energy of the river. I cranked up my shutter speed to 1/2500 of a second to freeze time and highlight the many droplets of water being thrust up into the air.


Water #1711 | © Jay Moore Photography


Waters Edge

Summer is officially upon us and the Eastern seaboard is already being hit by an extreme heat wave. The blistering hot weather makes me think of future trips to the ocean to sit along the waters edge with my feet in the waves coming ashore.

Here’s to daydreaming of trips to your favorite cooling off spot …


Waters Edge | © Jay Moore Photography


Zion National Park | Sunrise

Zion National Park is a special place and is a location that I highly recommend visiting at least once in your lifetime. The valley walls, which extend thousands of feet straight up have been carved out in part by the Virgin River. The rivers meandering path provides for many great opportunities for grand scenes such as in the image below.

I set up my tripod with one of the legs in the river and made sure to use a somewhat slower shutter speed to create some movement in the water. I used the partially overcast skies, sometimes an issue in landscape photography, to my advantage. The clouds worked sort of like a large soft box in the sky, which created a diffused light and helped open up some of the shadows within the valley floor.


Zion National Park | Sunrise | © Jay Moore Photography

If you’d like to see additional images within my portfolio, click on the this link … Jay Moore Photography Website


Merced River | Morning Light

Bends in the river are always something to take note of when photographing an area, especially if you can get yourself to a vantage point above the river, giving your images a feeling that you’re floating over it.

In the image below, I scouted and found the location within Yosemite National Park and came back to it several times during my stay. And on one of the crisp mornings when the light hit the lower trees, it showcased a beautiful reflection in the calm Merced River.


Morning Light | Merced River | © Jay Moore Photography


Upper Horsetail Falls | Columbia River Gorge

Upper Horsetail Falls is one of those beautiful locations on this earth that gives inspiration for the future, while grounding you in the moment. Its bowl shape and green foliage surroundings gives a feeling of something created through the mind of a child’s dream, yet when you walk beneath the falls (as in the image below) reality snaps back into your mind as you feel and hear the power of the rushing water.


Upper Horsetail Falls | Columbia River Gorge | © Jay Moore Photography

If ever visiting the Northwest (or even if you live there), a trip to the Columbia River Gorge is always a must on your to do list. Because a day in the Gorge is always a great day.


Colorful Mist

The mist of a raging waterfall can sometimes produce an amazing show of colors. If the sun is at a correct angle, its rays break through the droplets of water, creating a dancing flow of color along the waterfalls edge. And since the scene changes constantly, it’s always a fun thing to view and photograph.

Below is one of a series of images I captured at Vernal Falls in Yosemite National Park …


Colorful Mist | © Jay Moore Photography


Yosemite Falls

Yosemite National Park is a wonderful place to visit if you’re looking for an adventure with one amazing view after another. It’s only a few hours east of San Francisco and is easily visited for a weekend trip if you’re ever in that part of the country.

Yosemite Falls is one of the main attractions as its rushing water seems to float down the massive cliffs, which register at 2,425 feet, the highest measured waterfall in North America and seventh tallest in the world.


Yosemite Falls | © Jay Moore Photography


Waterfall

Waterfalls are high up on my list of favorite things to photograph. And when enjoying such wonderful natural environments, it’s good to remember to focus on some of the details and capture some images of small segments of the falls, which can produce some very interesting scenes. I did that with the image below and focused my lens on one area of Multnomah Falls, which is a beautiful falls located in the Columbia Gorge just outside of Portland, Oregon. I converted the final scene to black and white to give it a dramatic look and match the contrast of water versus rock.


Waterfall | © Jay Moore Photography


Footsteps

Sometimes in life the only way to know which direction to move forward is by looking back at the steps that got you where you are today …


Footsteps | © Jay Moore Photography


Water 8871


Raging Water | © Jay Moore Photography

I alway enjoy photographing near a raging river and capturing the droplets of water as they get tossed into the air. It’s exciting to freeze a brief moment of time of the waters journey to its final destination, especially since its when the water erupts out of its form and dances with the air.

To capture such scenes, it’s critical to get as close to the action as possible, use your longest lens and make sure to crank your shutter speed as fast as you’re able.


Water 8862

Water 8862 | © Jay Moore Photography

I enjoy photographing the many forms that water takes within nature. One of the most intense is on the edge of a raging river, which is where I found myself on a new years eve hike with my wife and some good friends.

Although I do like the look of a long exposure with moving water, which creates a blurred motion, I also love the look of fast moving water completely frozen in time. I enjoy freezing the scene and capturing individual droplets of water being thrown into the air, showcasing the pure power of the river, while creating interesting shapes.

If you plan on trying to freeze this type of motion, make sure to crank up your shutter speed (image above was at 1/2000 sec) and then let your f/stop and ISO fall where ever you feel comfortable (image above is f/4.5 and ISO640). And find an area of the fast moving water that has a background that’s within the shade, which will help highlight the water droplets when they get flung up into the air. Since you never know exactly what you’re going to get with the droplets (since the water is moving so fast), it’s a good idea to capture several images of the scene.