The West

St. Mary Lake | Glacier National Park

St. Mary Lake is a great location to visit and photograph while in Glacier National Park. The below scene is from an area that is frequented by many tour buses and cars, as there’s a parking area across the road. Even though it’s somewhat crowded at times, depending on if you arrive with a tour bus, you should still visit the location because it has an amazing view of St. Mary Lake and Wild Goose Island and is worth every second of your stop. Plus it’s one of the easiest spots to reach in all of the park, so it’s a great place to revisit at different times of the day.

Below is during early afternoon so the sun is still high in the sky. The white puffy clouds were perfect and helped create drama within a midday lit scene. I converted the final image into black and white with Nik Software’s Silver Efex Pro 2.


St Mary Lake | Glacier National Park | © Jay Moore Photography

Research Insight: We wore out both Vicky Spring’s book (Glacier National Park and Waterton Lakes National Park) and our iphone App (HIKE – Glacier National Park).

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Bear Grass on Highline Trail | Glacier National Park

Highline Trail in Glacier National Park is truly a hike of a lifetime. The trail is a visual feast that gives your soul a day of beauty and relaxation as you soak in one amazing view after another. It’s a location that’s highly recommended and can’t be missed if you’re ever in the area. The hike is not easy, but with every turn and slight change in landscape, it pushes you on and keeps your feet moving forward to see what’s around the next mountain side.

We were lucky to have the bear grass peaking during our time on the trail, which gave us many interesting foregrounds. In the image below, we came across some beautiful bear grass, so I quickly set up my composition as the rest of the group continued along the trail. My focus was on the bear grass with the beautiful mountains as the backdrop to the scene. However, as I was waiting for my hiking group to clear, I decided to capture the scene with my wife just about to turn the corner of the mountain side, which makes the image stronger as it gives the viewer a point of interest along the trail.


Bear Grass on Highline Trail | © Jay Moore Photography

Photography / Hiking Insight: We started on the trail at 9 am, but I would suggest to try and leave slightly before (8 am in August) and plan on doing the out and back hike from Logan Pass. It’s a little longer than option two (a one-way trip to ‘The Loop’, however, this option concludes with four miles straight down a mountain with very limited views). Although heading back to Logan Pass adds some miles, it’s a gradual slope and easier on your body with better views for your eyes and camera.

Research Insight: We wore out both Vicky Spring’s book (Glacier National Park and Waterton Lakes National Park) and our iphone App (HIKE – Glacier National Park).

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Iceberg Lake | Glacier National Park

Iceberg Lake is a beautiful location within Glacier National Park and as its name says, there are small iceberg pieces that float on the lake well into summer. The lake sits at 6094 feet, directly beneath sheer cliffs shaped like a horseshoe bowl. The surrounding peaks tower over 2500 feet above the icebergs, giving the area a dramatic look and feel. During the day of our hike, there was bad weather moving into the area, but that didn’t stop us from taking the nearly 10 mile round trip and 1300 feet elevation change to the base of the turquoise blue water.

In the image below, you can see my good friend continuing on the path around to the left of the lake. I had just finished composing the image and setting up my tripod and was able to capture the scene of his hike along the path, which helps give perspective to the massive area.


Iceberg Lake | Glacier National Park | © Jay Moore Photography

Hiking / Photography Insight: The hike up to Iceberg Lake should be taken as early as you can make it up. Since the opening to the lake faces East beneath a horseshoe bowl, the shadows on the cliffs can be severe if visited in the afternoon hours. Or consider visiting the location on a overcast day, as it will help create even lighting on the cliffs, although you will sacrifice some color within the lake as the sky and bright sun help give the water its amazing color.

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Canadian Rockies | Ordaray Mountain

The image below is another reminder that just because you have an unfavorable weather forecast, morning clouds, rain or a potential thunderstorm, to continue with your photography plans. For my wife and I, we were going to take the trip up to the Lake O’Hara region no matter what mother nature threw at us. However, the day before our big trip, to arguably one of the most beautiful places in the world, there was rain and thunderstorms in the forecast.

We woke that morning and stayed positive (unlike the night before when the photographer of the family was slightly cranky), caught the permit only bus up to Lake O’Hara and made our way up to the Alpine circuit. Because we got somewhat lucky and there were building clouds throughout the afternoon, some puffy whites and some storm, it provided for spectacular skies (even though we knew those skies could turn on us at any moment and cut our hike short). The sun kept popping from behind those clouds throughout the day, and when we turned one corner of our hike, we got an amazing view of Ordaray Mountain bathed in partial sunlight. I switched out to a longer lens (70-200mm) to compress the scene to showcase the mountain range against the amazing sky.


Canadian Rockies | Ordaray Mountain | © Jay Moore Photography

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Accomplishment | People In Nature

First off, let me start by saying my wife is a saint. She is JMP’s number one fan and supporter. And as a significant other of a photographer (as some of you out there might understand), she patiently understands my passion of capturing the world one frame at a time. She always smiles when I talk about directional lighting, constantly nods her head when I discuss shape within a scene, but what makes her so special to me and my business is her willingness to always help out. As a small business owner, you need as many people in your corner as you can get and having your wife leading the effort always makes me smile from ear to ear.

So, when I decided that on our recent trip to the Rockies, I wanted more of my images to include people within my landscape photography, my wife happily accepted the challenge and helped me create some very impactful images of people in nature.

Below is one of those scene where I wanted to include a person within nature, so my wife took a prominent spot on the rock ledge looking out over the Lake O’Hara region while I composed and snapped several frames.

The scene has an accomplishment type energy to it and would work well for businesses that want to showcase that energy to their staff or customers. ‘Accomplishment’ text could be included within the scene if wanted.


Accomplishment | People In Nature | © Jay Moore Photography

Continue to check back for additional images of ‘People In Nature’ as some of our close friends help me capture some stunning images in the Rockies …

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Valley of the Ten Peaks & Larch Valley

Valley of the Ten Peaks and the Moraine Lake area have one spectacular view after another, including the stunning hike up to Sentinel Pass, which takes you through Larch Valley. The views begin to open up as you plod through the valley with grand views of Valley of the Ten Peaks showing itself as you entire into the alpine section.

My wife and I actually took the trail on two different occasions, as we both feel in love with it on our first ascent to the top of Sentinel Pass. So, on our last day in the Canadian Rockies we decided to take a side trip to Larch Valley after spending the morning hiking to Eiffel Lake. During our first hike through the area, we enjoyed the beautiful wildflowers and awe-inspiring views, however, I realized after the hike that I missed one particular image. I didn’t capture any scenes with the many calm, small lakes that dot larch valley. So, on our second trip up, I focused upon the reflections of the small lakes and after working the area, I found myself in front of a piece of wood and a few rocks with some of the best scenery in the world as the back ground.


Valley of the Ten Peaks | Larch Valley | © Jay Moore Photography

The image above is another reminder that you have to work the scene no matter where you are, keep moving your feet and try to find a slightly different image from the one you just took. It was roughly 15-20 minutes before I finished with the above scene. If I would have just taken one image of this small lake, it would resulted in just an average image, but with persistence I was able to capture a scene that ended up being one of my favorites during our time in the Rockies.

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Mt. Wilbur Building Storm | Glacier National Park

It’s impressive when storms build in the Rocky Mountains, as it can create very interesting combinations of light, clouds and mountains.

When my wife and a couple of our closest friends made the trek up to Iceberg Lake, we were slammed with some stormy weather during the conclusion of our hike. And although we got rained on for a brief time, the building storm clouds provided for some dramatic scenes of Mount Wilbur, which looms over 3,000 feet above the valley floor.


Mt. Wilbur Building Storm | Glacier National Park | © Jay Moore Photography

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Avalanche Gorge | Glacier National Park

The hike up to Avalanche Lake has an exhilarating start (and end) as Avalanche Creek takes a loud and fast route down through Avalanche Gorge. The glacier water is a beautiful sight as the turquoise water rushes through narrow, carved rock, giving the area a must stop at both the beginning and end of your hike.

The photo below is toward the end of the gorge from the bridge that is apart of the ‘Trail of the Cedars.’


Avalanche Gorge | © Jay Moore Photography

Hiking Insight: This is a very popular trail and is considered a somewhat easier hike within GNP, as it’s roughly 4 miles round trip with an elevation gain of about 600 feet. This is a great afternoon hike, as the main cliffs that surround the lake faces west, so starting the hike at or after lunch time is recommended. This is also a great hike to combine with another smaller hike that can be taken in the morning, such as Hidden Lake near Logan Pass.

Research Insight: We wore out both Vicky Spring’s book (Glacier National Park and Waterton Lakes National Park: A Complete Recreation Guide) and our iphone App (HIKE – Glacier National Park) and I highly suggest purchasing them both before your visit.

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Grinnell Glacier Overlook | Glacier National Park

One of the most spectacular views in all of Glacier National Park is the hike up to Grinnell Glacier Overlook. It’s a spur trail off the Highline trail that takes you up to the Garden Wall, which is the continental divide. It’s a difficult trail as it ascends over a 1,000 feet in just over one mile, however, the extra effort is well worth it as the views are one of a kind.

We got to the top of the overlook just about at solar noon, which gave us perfect lighting to see the entire valley. The view starts with The Salamander and Grinnell Glacier in the foreground and the Garden Wall sweeping around to the right. Upper Grinnell Lake is just appearing with Grinnell Lake, Lake Josephine and Lake Sherburne dotted down the valley. Perched at roughly 8,200 feet the valley below is about 2,500 feet lower, making for a dramatic scene.


Grinnell Glacier Overlook | Glacier National Park | © Jay Moore Photography

Photography / Hiking Insight: When you get to the top of the overlook, take a look, but don’t stop. Continue up to your right on the boot beaten path to the best view. It’s not that much extra work and it gives you the entire view down the valley, as seen in the image above. Also, it’s best to take this hike in the morning (leaving Logan Pass by about 8 am in August) in order to arrive at the view point at around mid-day or just after solar noon, giving you full light throughout the valley with only a small shadow from the Garden Wall.

Research Insight: We wore out both Vicky Spring’s book (Glacier National Park and Waterton Lakes National Park) and our iphone App (HIKE – Glacier National Park).

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Lake O’Hara | Canadian Rockies

Lake O’Hara is one of the most beautiful locations in the world … And the alpine circuit trail is arguably one of the best day hikes that you can ever experience. If you’re visiting this part of the world, I highly recommend putting this area on your itinerary.

We got extremely lucky with weather on the day we were scheduled for this once-in-a-lifetime hike (more on that in a future blog post … my wife is currently smiling). The storm held off and instead of getting the rain and thunderstorms that were forecasted we got spectacular skies filled with puffy white and building storm clouds.

The image below is toward the end of the alpine circuit looking out from Opabin Prospect with the Wiwaxy Peaks hovering over Lake O’Hara on the right and Odaray Mountain towards the left in the background. If you look closely at the lake, you can see a boat gliding through the turquoise blue water, which I think works perfectly to help give perspective of the massive mountains surrounding Lake O’Hara.


Lake O’Hara | © Jay Moore Photography

Photography / Hiking Insight: Make sure to call ahead to book your Lake O’Hara permit, as they only allow a very limited number of day hikers into the region per day. Trust me, the hours spent on hold a few months before your trip is completely worth it when you’re hiking the alpine circuit. The alpine circuit is not easy, but is do able for most people. It starts with a difficult incline to Wiwaxy Gap (which is directly above the last ‘h’ in my watermark, where there is a small dip on the crest of the mountain), but then levels out throughout the rest of the way. Plus, you are experiencing one spectacular view after another, so the small inclines and declines are barely noticeable.

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Achievement | People In Nature

The image below comes as close to a motivational poster that I’ve ever photographed. It was a result of being at the right place at the right time with the right gear … Luck meets preparation.

During one of the pretties hikes within the Canadian Rockies that my wife and I took (Sentinel Pass to Paradise Valley within Banff National Park) we stopped for about 15-20 minutes to let the other half of our hiking group catch up, as we were scrabbling down a steep boulder section and they needed to take a little longer to traverse the section safely.

As we were waiting, another hiker pointed out there were climbers on the hoodoo rock directly in front of us. Since we had some time, I switched out to my 70-200mm lens and my 2x extender (thus 400mm lens), and began snapping a few frames of the climber up the rock face, knowing that I would fire off several when he arrived at the top. The day was beautiful with lots of puffy clouds and the rock was in shade pretty much the entire time he was climbing. However, right as he was getting to the top, the sun popped out, bathing the hoodoo in a golden glow, which created a perfect contrast to the large cliffs behind him, which had a blue hue within the shade.


Achievement | © Jay Moore Photography

Photography / Hiking Insight: My wife and I decided to do the thru hike up to Sentinel Pass and down to Paradise Valley. As for lighting in August, I would suggest getting on the trail somewhat earlier (8ish), so by the time you get to the top of Sentinel Pass, the lighting is still at the correct angle for views back into the Valley of the Ten Peaks, while still giving you nice light for your hike down into Paradise Valley. It’s a long hike, we tracked it at 16 miles, but the day was spectacular and we considered it one of the best hikes we took the entire time we were in the Canadian Rockies. However, the next time we will probably do each hike separately on different days (Day 1 – up and back to Sentinel Pass Day; Day 2 – hike into Paradise Valley).

Research: We primarily used Kathy and Craig Copeland’s book (Don’t Waste Your Time in the Canadian Rockies; The Opinionated Hiking Guide) and it was right on with every hike that it suggested. We also used Brian Patton and Bart Robinson’s book (Canadian Rockies Trail Guide) which was a great resource and provided details of each of the hikes we took. I would suggest getting them both, as you can do lots of your research before even arriving within the area.

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Moraine Lake and Valley of The Ten Peaks | Sunrise

Moraine Lake and the Valley of the Ten Peaks is absolutely breathtaking. My wife and I recently visited this location for the first time when we were in the Canadian Rockies and it instantly jumped to the top of our ‘must return to list.’ We spent many days within the area hiking and soaking up the many amazing views. No matter if you’re a photographer, painter or someone who just enjoys natures beauty, this is a place that you must visit with your own eyes.

The lake is a gorgeous color of bright turquoise because of the glacier water and sediment that flows into and settles within the lake. That glacier sediment only reflects a small range of blues and greens, giving the water an almost unreal color. It sits directly below the Valley of Ten Peaks (seven of the peaks are seen within the image below), which are all over 10,000 feet and are between 4,000 to 5,000 feet above the waters edge, giving the area a dramatic look during any time of day.

I woke on one of the mornings to photograph sunrise from one of the iconic spots to view the lake, on top of the ‘Rockpile’ (which is just that, a massive rock pile that sits on one side of the lakes edge). I got to the spot I had scouted a couple days before, composed my image to include a foreground of trees and rocks and began firing my shutter when the sun first hit the top of the tallest mountain peaks. For the first 20-30 minutes the weather was pretty much perfect, as there was no breeze and the water was as clear as glass, which created an amazing reflection within its blueish hue.


Moraine Lake and Valley of The Ten Peaks | © Jay Moore Photography

Photography / Hiking Insight: As said above, Moraine Lake is beautiful anytime of day to visit, but sunrise and sunset bring a special light to this magical place, giving it even more drama than usual. I enjoyed the morning light more than evening (August) since it touched on many of the Ten Peaks (was at location about 15 minutes before the scheduled sunrise). However, the evening light was very dramatic (at location about 2-hours before scheduled sunset for best angled light), but since the Canadian Rockies generate its own clouds throughout the day, we only had a few small windows to photograph the scene before the clouds covered the dramatic light.

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Hidden Lake and Mountain Goat

Glacier National Park has many beautiful locations to view and enjoy when visiting, including the short hike up to Hidden Lake overlook. It’s one of the most crowded trails within the park, but is one that must not be missed, as the views are some of the best you’ll get when visiting Glacier NP.

And the image below is an example of when preparation meets luck, you can create something special.

The option to hike the remaining trail down to the lake was closed because of bear activities near the water, since the trout were spawning and several bears were in the area feeding. However, that fact ended up being a great benefit, since we stayed probably longer than we would of at the overlook with binoculars in hand scanning the lake to try and see a bear (and also because I went on a small side hike to photograph a few big horned sheep … images to come shortly). And just as we were about to leave, a mountain goat strolled into the area, walked around a bit and then stopped at the edge of the cliff looking down to Hidden Lake and Bearhat Mountain. It just stood there for a handful of seconds, right in front of us, as if it was soaking up the amazing view. All my camera settings were already set as I had been photographing the scene without the mountain goat for several minutes before. I was able to snap a few frames, including the image below, before it headed down the mountain side.


Hidden Lake and Mountain Goat | © Jay Moore Photography

Hiking Insight: This is a very popular trail and is considered a somewhat easier hike within GNP, as it’s roughly 3 miles round trip to the overlook with an elevation gain of about 480 feet. This is also a great hike to combine with another smaller hike that can be taken in the afternoon, such as Avalanche Lake near Lake McDonald (see previous post).

Research Insight: We wore out both Vicky Spring’s book (Glacier National Park and Waterton Lakes National Park: A Complete Recreation Guide) and our iphone App (HIKE – Glacier National Park) and I highly suggest purchasing them both before your visit.

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Capturing Light | Building Storm

Most folks get upset when a storm begins to build while on vacation as sometimes it pushes you inside for cover, however, you have to try and stay positive because building storms can give you great opportunities to capture dramatic images. We were reminded of that recently when a storm began to build within Glacier National Park.

The image below is from the banks of Lake Sherburne looking back into Many Glacier as a massive storm rolled into the area. We stopped the car and I jumped out and was able to capture a few frames of the light dancing with the clouds.


Capturing Light | Building Storm | Glacier National Park | © Jay Moore Photography

Make sure to stop by over the next couple of weeks to see more highlight images from my time within Glacier National Park and the Canadian Rockies …

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Avalanche Lake | Glacier National Park

Avalanche Lake is a breathtaking location, as it’s positioned at the bottom of a massive bowl with cliffs jetting thousands of feet into the air. The rock slopes contain multiple cascading falls which feed the glacier colored waters, giving it a bright green/blue hue during a clear, sunny day.

The image below is taken close to the waters edge with my wide angle lens at 18mm (full frame sensor) to create a foreground interest of the rocks and trees within the clear, glass like water.


Avalanche Lake | Glacier National Park | © Jay Moore Photography

Photography / Hiking Insight: This location is beautiful at any time of the day, but since the main part of the bowl gets afternoon sun, I would suggest starting this hike in mid-day or afternoon. The lighting will be better during this time of day, along with the fact that the hiking crowds will diminish slightly.

Hiking Insight: This is a very popular trail and is considered a somewhat easier hike within GNP, as it’s roughly 4 miles round trip with an elevation gain of about 600 feet. You can extend the hike by doing a boot beaten path fully around the lake as we did, but fair warning, you must wade through thigh high glacier water to complete the loop (but the solitude on the other side was nice). This was the first hike during our trip to GNP after getting in somewhat late the night before. It worked out perfectly to have a relaxing morning, unpack and then head to the trailhead around lunch time. This is also a great hike to combine with another smaller hike that can be taken in the morning, such as Hidden Lake near Logan Pass.

Research Insight: We wore out both Vicky Spring’s book (Glacier National Park and Waterton Lakes National Park: A Complete Recreation Guide) and our iphone App (HIKE – Glacier National Park) and I highly suggest purchasing them both before your visit.

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Bear Grass | Glacier National Park

Glacier National Park is home to a vary unusual type of wildflower, bear grass. It grows in very particular climates for only a short period of time. The blooms are long and skinny with a cone like top and are made up of many tiny white flowers that give off a mild, enjoyable scent.

The image below is looking down the valley of McDonald Creek as it winds its way to Lake McDonald, as several mountains tower over 5,000 feet above the flowing water (Heavens Peak and Mount Vaught on camera right, with Mount Cannon, Clements Mountain and Mount Oberlin on camera left).


Bear Grass | Glacier National Park | © Jay Moore Photography

Photography Insight: The landscape within GNP is very large so it’s important to try and anchor the foreground with something of interest, in this case bear grass, or include a person or something within the scene to help give perspective to the entire image.

Photography / Hiking Insight: We started on Highline Trail at 9 am, but I would suggest to try and leave slightly before (8 am in August) and plan on doing the out and back hike from Logan Pass. It’s a little longer than option two (a one-way trip to ‘The Loop’, however, this option concludes with four miles straight down a mountain with very limited views). Although heading back to Logan Pass adds some miles, it’s a gradual slope and easier on your body with better views for your eyes and camera.

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.


Glacier National Park | Glacier Lilies | Highline Trail

I recently had the opportunity to visit Glacier National Park for the first time with my wife and a couple of our closest friends. The area quickly catapulted to the top of the list for national parks, as it was one of the most beautiful places we’ve all ever seen with our own eyes.

One of the most scenic hikes within Glacier National Park is the Highline Trail, which skirts along the alpine section of several of the parks tallest mountain sides, giving you one stunning view after another. It starts at Logan Pass and slowly makes its way to the Granite Park Chalet about 7.6 miles away.

One of the x-factors when visiting GNP and hiking on Highline Trail are the wildflowers, as they’re directly linked to when the snow melts within the area. And since it melts differently almost every year, you have to book your dates, cross your fingers and hope for the best. We got extremely lucky as the wildflowers were peaking within the alpine level during our time there, including large patches of bright yellow, glacier lilies. When we came across a patch, I positioned myself to showcase them in the foreground of some of the most iconic landscape within the park, Bird Women Falls surrounded by Mount Oberlin, Clements Mountain and Mound Cannon, with Little Cheif Mountain looming large in the back left.


Glacier National Park | Glacier Lilies | © Jay Moore Photography

Photography / Hiking Insight: We started on the trail at 9 am, but I would suggest to try and leave slightly before (8 am in August) and plan on doing the out and back hike from Logan Pass. It’s a little longer than option two (a one-way trip to ‘The Loop’, however, this option concludes with four miles straight down a mountain with very limited views). Although heading back to Logan Pass adds some miles, it’s a gradual slope and easier on your body with better views for your eyes and camera.

Research Insight: We wore out both Vicky Spring’s book (Glacier National Park and Waterton Lakes National Park) and our iphone App (HIKE – Glacier National Park).

Print Purchase: If you’re interested in purchasing a photographic print, the image above (and all images posted on my blog) are available in all sizes. Please email be directly through the ‘contact Jay’ link located at the top of the page.